Misericordia University students stream coverage of sporting and cultural events

By Eileen Godin - egodin@timesleader.com
Misericordia students, from left, Samantha MidKiff, Sean Lynch, Kevin Brown and Billy Peet are shown during a live broadcast. - Submitted photo
Mass Communication students at Misericordia University produce a live broadcast of a university basketball game. Shown, from left, Sean Lynch, Dan Kimbrough, an assistant professor of Mass Communications; Parker Abate and Monica McManus. - Submitted photo
Misericordia University’s Mass Communications Department broadcasts sporting and cultural events through a Youtube channel, which reaches a larger audience. Here, Misericordia student Mike Diakunczak operates a digital camera during a live sporting event broadcast. - Submitted photo

DALLAS TWP. — Misericordia University’s sporting and cultural events are being broadcast live by students via the campus television station’s YouTube channel.

The new media outlet is giving alumni, students, local and out-of-state families an avenue to view campus events while providing broadcast students an opportunity to fine tune their skill set, said Dan Kimbrough, assistant professor of Mass Communications and Design at Misericordia University.

“I know how to write and produce which will make me stand out — I’ll be well rounded and able to get a job because I can do more,” said Parker Abate, a junior Mass Communications major from St. Charles, Ill.

The campus television station called MCN87 began live broadcasting of sporting events, said Sean Lynch, a senior Mass Communications major and sports director with MCN87.

When Misericordia’s Mass Communication and Design teamed with the athletic department, sporting event streaming developed into a learning opportunity to produce live programming.

Misericordia’s athletic department was already streaming, Lynch said, adding someone was hired to do the audio.

“We initially started streaming on Facebook,” Lynch said. “That is what was easiest for us at the time. Our first stream was a basketball game in December.”

However, viewership was limited to Facebook users, Lynch said. YouTube was chosen later because of its ease of access for a wider audience, he said.

MCN87 has up to four broadcasts a week that receive an average of 50 to 100 live views, Kimbrough said. Viewership can grow up to 400 in a week, Kimbrough said.

Feedback from viewers is positive.

“Parents love it,” Lynch said.

Abate heard students who are unable to attend a sporting event are watching it online in their dorms.

The growing interest is spurring communication students to develop pre-game, half-time and post-game shows, Lynch said.

Fifth-year senior Tony Vega from Cornwall, N.Y., the station’s liaison with the athletic department, said they were able to produce some pre- and post-game shows which enhances game viewing.

Vega provided the player statistics for the game coverage but learned he liked announcing sports on-air. The streaming broadcast also taught Vega that he likes to troubleshoot problems.

“I enjoy the two hours before a live broadcast when everything goes wrong,” Vega said. “I love the problem solving and the pressure.”

Kimbrough cycles students through a broadcast to give everyone an opportunity to produce, direct, operate cameras, write and transmit to YouTube. The live streaming has also incorporated other departments, such as the graphic design department.

“We will be transmitting the graduation,” Kimbrough said. “I have the graphic design department making graphics for that.”

MCN87 has also transmitted on-campus cultural events, Kimbrough said.

To see the past and present productions, visit http://bit.ly/mcn87.

Misericordia students, from left, Samantha MidKiff, Sean Lynch, Kevin Brown and Billy Peet are shown during a live broadcast.
https://www.mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_Dallas-post-1.jpgMisericordia students, from left, Samantha MidKiff, Sean Lynch, Kevin Brown and Billy Peet are shown during a live broadcast. Submitted photo

Mass Communication students at Misericordia University produce a live broadcast of a university basketball game. Shown, from left, Sean Lynch, Dan Kimbrough, an assistant professor of Mass Communications; Parker Abate and Monica McManus.
https://www.mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_dallas-post-2.jpgMass Communication students at Misericordia University produce a live broadcast of a university basketball game. Shown, from left, Sean Lynch, Dan Kimbrough, an assistant professor of Mass Communications; Parker Abate and Monica McManus. Submitted photo

Misericordia University’s Mass Communications Department broadcasts sporting and cultural events through a Youtube channel, which reaches a larger audience. Here, Misericordia student Mike Diakunczak operates a digital camera during a live sporting event broadcast.
https://www.mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_Dallas-post-3.jpgMisericordia University’s Mass Communications Department broadcasts sporting and cultural events through a Youtube channel, which reaches a larger audience. Here, Misericordia student Mike Diakunczak operates a digital camera during a live sporting event broadcast. Submitted photo
Misericordia students stream coverage of sporting, cultural events

By Eileen Godin

egodin@timesleader.com

Misericordia University’s

Munson Center Network 87’s

YouTube channel is

http://bit.ly/mcn87.

Reach Eileen Godin at 570-991-6387 or on Twitter @TLNews.

Reach Eileen Godin at 570-991-6387 or on Twitter @TLNews.