Kingston Township to participate in Luzerne County mosquito spray Aug. 2

Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mosquitoes like this one can infect human beings with the West Nile Virus. The South Department of Health & Environmental Control has confirmed that there is a human case of West Nile Virus in Union County. Union County residents are being urged to take steps to protect themselves from the virus by eliminating all sources of standing water on their property, including flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, birdbaths, old car tires, rain gutters and pet bowls. - Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mosquitoes

KINGSTON TWP. — The Back Mountain township will participate in the Luzerne County mosquito spraying slated for Thursday, Aug. 2, according to a news release.

Kingston Township residents, who are registered to receive emailed announcements, were notified Monday about the scheduled insecticide treatment. The municipality, along with Swoyersville, Forty Fort, parts of Edwardsville and Kingston boroughs and Wilkes-Barre City will be sprayed in the early evening with AquaDUET, which is a type of insecticide that will reduce the adult mosquito populations that may carry West Nile Virus.

“The application material has a very low toxicity profile to mammals and will have negligible impact to non-target insects and the environment,” the release stated.

Humans can contract West Nile Virus from infected mosquitoes. The virus “can result in an inflammation of the brain,” the news release stated.

On Thursday, AquaDUET will be sprayed, at a rate of 0.61 ounces per acre, by truck-mounted equipment to residential and recreational areas identified as mosquito habitats, the release reported.

If weather conditions are unfavorable, the spraying will be postponed to Friday night.

In 2018, West Nile Virus was found in both Lackawanna and Luzerne counties, as well as, Adams, Allegheny, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bucks, Cambria, Carbon, Centre, Chester, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Elk, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Huntingdon, Indiana, Juniata, Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Lycoming, Mercer, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, Snyder, Somerset, Union, Washington, Westmoreland, Wyoming and York, the release reported.

Kingston Township’s email offered the following tips for residents to reduce mosquito population by removing potential breeding areas.

• Dispose of cans, buckets, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar containers that hold water.

• Properly dispose of discarded tires that can collect water. Stagnant water is where most mosquitoes breed.

• Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers.

• Clean roof gutters annual to prevent stagnant water caused by plugged drains.

• Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.

• Turn over wheelbarrows and don’t let water stagnate in birdbaths.

• Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish.

• Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, remove any water that may collect on pool covers. Treat stagnant pools of water with BTI products, which contain a natural bacterium that kills mosquito larvae but is safe for people, pets aquatic life and plants.

Also, the following tips can prevent mosquito bites.

• Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.

• Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors.

• When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk as well as during peak mosquito periods, which is April through October.

• Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer’s instructions. An effective repellent will contain DEET, Picaridin or lemon eucalyptus oil. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician for questions about the use of repellent on children under the age of two months.

Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Mosquitoes like this one can infect human beings with the West Nile Virus. The South Department of Health & Environmental Control has confirmed that there is a human case of West Nile Virus in Union County. Union County residents are being urged to take steps to protect themselves from the virus by eliminating all sources of standing water on their property, including flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, birdbaths, old car tires, rain gutters and pet bowls.
https://www.mydallaspost.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Mosquito.jpgPhoto courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Mosquitoes like this one can infect human beings with the West Nile Virus. The South Department of Health & Environmental Control has confirmed that there is a human case of West Nile Virus in Union County. Union County residents are being urged to take steps to protect themselves from the virus by eliminating all sources of standing water on their property, including flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, birdbaths, old car tires, rain gutters and pet bowls.
Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mosquitoes